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    Which way to class?

    During the pandemic, learning has become a juggling act. Ontario high school students have had to go back and forth between learning in a classroom with masks on and learning through a computer screen at home.  Both students and teachers have had to roll with the punches with new government regulations. After a restful summer, high school students have many questions about what their learning is going to look like come September.  For the Fall 2021 semester, the Ontario government announced a hybrid learning plan across the province in elementary and high schools. With the hybrid model, a student’s educational journey will be in their own hands.  A York Region…

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    The impact of virtual learning on marginalized students

    The side effects of moving in and out of lockdown has exposed a growing issue for marginalized youth in the Canadian education system. While most at risk in terms of health and well-being, these students had to quickly adapt to a transition to virtual classrooms and juggle challenges such as economic hardship, cultural pressures and finding access to technology. A study by Wilfred Laurier University found that students most affected by online classes and isolation are those who identify as racialized or Indigenous, newcomers or individuals from disabled populations.  These groups suffer from an achievement gap, in which there is a significant learning loss compared to students living in high-income…

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    Going abroad for an internship: What to expect

    It was a particularly busy day for news — a particularly busy month — when I was seated at my intern desk in CBC’s London office, frantically dialing the phone. It was the height of the outbreak of COVID-19 in Italy and I had been tasked that day to land an interview with an Italian health professional for one of CBC’s senior journalists.  After four hours of anxiously dialing numbers and trying to communicate with doctors who didn’t speak any English, I decided to try my hand at Italian by typing what I wanted to say into Google translate and reading it aloud over the phone.  Working in an extremely intimate newsroom meant that…

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    Community and connection for international students studying in Canada

    International student enrollments in Canada have more than tripled over the past 10 years, according to Statistics Canada. Young people from all over the world are drawn to Canada’s warm and welcoming culture as well as diverse population, making it an appealing destination for students looking to attend university abroad.  Travelling internationally to study is an exciting and life-changing experience, but it can also garner feelings of isolation and anxiety. Ira Famarin and Harkrishan (Harry) Singh Punn are two students studying at Canadian universities who are from Singapore and Oman, respectively. They say that building a community in Canada while virtually keeping in touch with family and friends from home has…

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    The delicate art of procrastination

    Chloe Chen dreamt about doing a school assignment. She had gone to sleep at three in the morning. Earlier that night, Chen, then a first-year student in Ryerson University’s fashion design program, had planned to complete a major project for one of her main school courses. A few hours prior, when Chen was finally about to start working on the assignment that she had left to the last minute, she received a text: A man asked her out on a date. Chen says that even at the time, she knew she had to do the project, but she was hungry and wanted to go out for dinner. She decided that…

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    What’s next after graduating

    Life after graduation Life after graduation can be quite dreary and unpredictable, especially in the times of a pandemic. Many recent graduates may have no idea what’s next. It can be challenging to find fulfilling work, particularly after the COVID-19 pandemic caused millions to lose their jobs. Youth Mind spoke to some recent graduates about their life in the wake of graduation. Pursuing interests outside field of study Graduates do not necessarily enter into their jobs immediately after graduation; some take time off to pursue other interests unrelated to their field of study. Sabrina S. graduated from the University of Waterloo in 2020 with an urban planning degree. She says she entered…

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    How to maintain academic excellence while working part-time

    It’s common for college and university students to work part-time while enrolled in school. According to Statistics Canada, over 52 per cent of college students in Canada, ages 15 to 19, worked during the 2017-18 and 2018-19 school years. That number rose to over 54 per cent for students ages 20 to 24. For universities, 34 per cent of students ages 15 to 19 worked during those years, while over 45 per cent of students ages 20 to 24 worked. The employment rate for post-secondary students was 52.5 per cent in Feb. 2020, before the COVID-19 pandemic caused that number to plummet. As the world returns to normal, many students will surely…

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    Students save money on public transit amid the pandemic

    Many college and university students in Ontario, particularly those in the Greater Toronto Area, normally take public transit to get to class. According to a 2015 survey of more than 15,000 students by StudentMoveTO — in collaboration with the University of Toronto, Ryerson University, OCAD and York University — 63 per cent of respondents reported the use of public transit to get to school. Ryerson’s data from 2017 to 2018 indicates that more than three-quarters of students at the university took public transit to school; 54 per cent used local transit like the TTC, while 23 per cent took regional transit like the GO train. For a Ryerson student like Abbey Humphreys-Morris, who takes…

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    Canadian tuition prices continuously rising as government funding declines

    The cost of university in Canada has been on the rise for the last few decades. More recently, there has been a steady increase of tuition costs in the past few years. A report that Statistics Canada released in 2018 showed that the cost of tuition for full-time undergraduate programs for the 2018-19 school year was $6,838, on average. That marked a 3.3 per cent increase from the previous academic year. The most expensive average tuition fees in undergraduate programs for the 2018-19 academic year were seen in dentistry ($23,474), medicine ($14,780), law ($13,332) and pharmacy ($10,746). Statistics Canada reported that “these four programs accounted for 3.6 [per cent] of all Canadian…

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    Athletes find ‘creative ways’ to continue training amid the pandemic

    In early June, the majority of sports conferences under U Sports, the governing body of university sports in Canada, cancelled games and championships for the fall semester because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But for the athletes affected, the routines built do not stop. Instead, they had to find creative solutions around the restrictions. “We were forced to develop a new way of training virtual online as a team, but even then, it just didn’t feel good enough as an athlete to be training from inside your home,” said Abdallah El-Chanti, a midfielder with Ryerson University’s men’s soccer team.  In addition to soccer, some of the sports cancelled are football, rugby,…

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    Why unpaid internships can be unfair to those who can’t afford to work for free

    For students, summer is always a great time to pick up a part time job and save some cash for the upcoming school year. With students often not working during the school year, a summer job helps cover expenses like rent and cost of living, as well as providing some pocket money.  Many universities require an internship to graduate. Even when they are not mandatory, internships are a great time to gain experience in one’s chosen field. The problem for students is that many of these internships are unpaid.  Adriana Cavalieri, who graduated from Mohawk College, was working full-time hours for her unpaid internship, while balancing school and her own…

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    How students and schools can successfully prepare for a semester of online learning

    As the fall semester gears up to start, college and university students will have a very different school year than usual. With the COVID-19 pandemic still ongoing, Canadian schools have decided to hold classes completely online. However, learning from home can make it challenging for students to stay concentrated and motivated. Looking at some ways to succeed can be beneficial to approaching this new way of learning, as well as understanding the adaptation schools are making in order to help students with this transition.   Transitioning into completely online courses will be a learning curve for students and professors. Johnathan Small, Associate Vice President of Online Learning at Regis College, wrote…